Friday, February 11, 2011

Remembering Logan Marr

It is a date I'd like to forget but know I should always remember - January 31, 2001.

That's the day we learned that a five-year-old girl - one who had visited our home only weeks before - was dead.

That news was tragic.

Revelations in the days that followed made the story even more so - Logan Marr was dead and a family friend was charged with causing her death.

Sally Ann Schofield was acquitted of depraved indifference murder but convicted of manslaughter. She is serving out the remaining seven of her 17-year sentence at the Maine Correctional Center in Windham.

The passage of 10 years does little to lessen the story's sadness or its surreal nature.

Sally had worked with my wife at the Maine Department of Human Services for several years. She and her family shared meals with us. They helped us move into our Chelsea home in 1997. She watched our daughter on occasion and we did the same for her two boys.

She invited us to her now-infamous Skyline Drive, Chelsea home when Logan and her younger sister Bailey came into her care. She wanted us to meet them and for them to meet and play with our daughter Emma.

And, finally, she visited us with Logan - in the above photo - in early December, a week or so after daughter Grace was born.

Seven weeks later, Logan was dead...found bound with 42 feet of duct tape in an overturned highchair in the Schofield's basement.

Only those in the home at the time will ever know the exact details of Logan's final moments. It appears, however, that she died alone...suffocating as she lay neglected by the person entrusted to care for her.

Someone who had worked with children in foster care for years.

Someone with birth children of her own.

Someone who engaged in the ultimate power struggle with a tantrumming young child and refused to back down.

Someone who should have known better.

And a beautiful doe-eyed child with long brown hair died as a result.

It was a death that never should have happened. It is also one that served as a catalyst for significant changes in Maine's child welfare system.

Despite the passage of time, finally, it is a death that should never be forgotten. I keep the photo of Logan's final visit so I never will.

5 comments:

  1. its sickening no words can describe the sadness of this story the child was wrongfully taken from her mum and as a result she was put into a bad home and the child had many many times mentioned times of abuse my the case worker and was ignored that's why that child is now dead and its taken the death of Logan for them to return bailey to where she was always most safe and always belonged so yes i blame the welfare system for this entirely they should be sued aswell

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  2. there was evident of signs of abuse and they neglected their duty of care to logan and bailey

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  3. there was evident of signs of abuse and they neglected their duty of care to logan and bailey

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  4. its sickening no words can describe the sadness of this story the child was wrongfully taken from her mum and as a result she was put into a bad home and the child had many many times mentioned times of abuse my the case worker and was ignored that's why that child is now dead and its taken the death of Logan for them to return bailey to where she was always most safe and always belonged so yes i blame the welfare system for this entirely they should be sued aswell

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  5. Why would a grown woman engage in a power struggle with a small child, while babysitting for my sister's youngest child, the tantrums were loud blood curdling screams, the moment she and her husband shut the front door on the way to work, it was part of our routine, after awhile he would cry himself out, switch chairs, watch me read, then come over and push me toward the kitchen, and demand some toast, he would eat, then it was me throwing about 500 games of "Candyland, until lunchtime.

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